Cycling

Original Text: Cycling


Introduction. – Intermittent training involving short-duration efforts is an effective method used in athletics and team sports to enhance maximum oxygen consumption. However, few studies aimed at exploring the effectiveness of this type of training on maximum oxygen uptake in cycling. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an intermittent training (30s/30s) at maximum aerobic power and with passive recovery permits to attain maximum oxygen uptake in well trained cyclists.
Methods and results. – Seven trained cyclists participated in this study. During a preliminary visit, the maximum oxygen uptake ( ) value of each subject was determined using a continuous incremental test on a bicycle ergometer. was evaluated using an automated breath by breath system (CPX; Medical Graphics, St Paul, Minnesota, USA). After one week of recovety, subjects performed 20 repetitions of 30 s cycling at maximum aerobic power alternated with 30 s passive recovery. and theoretical maximum heart rate were not reached in this group of well-trained cyclists during this session of intermittent training.
Conclusion. – This study suggests that this type of intermittent training does not permit to reach the maximum oxygen consumption or the maximum heart rate in well trained cyclists.

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Revised Text:

Introduction – Intermittent training involving short-duration efforts is an effective method used in athletics and team sports to enhance maximum oxygen consumption. However, few studies have attempted exploring the effectiveness of this type of training on maximum oxygen uptake in cycling.

The aim of this study was to investigate whether an intermittent training (30sec./30sec.) at maximum aerobic power and with passive recovery permits well trained cyclists to attain maximum oxygen uptake.

Methods and results – Seven trained cyclists participated in this study. During a preliminary visit, the maximum oxygen uptake value of each subject was determined using a continuous incremental test on a bicycle ergometer. This was evaluated using an automated breath by breath system (CPX; Medical Graphics, St Paul, Minnesota, USA.)

After one week of recovery, subjects performed 20 repetitions of 30 seconds cycling at maximum aerobic power alternated with 30 seconds passive recovery. The theoretical maximum heart rates were not reached in this group of well-trained cyclists during this session of intermittent training.

Conclusion – The study suggests that this type of intermittent training does not permit reaching the maximum oxygen consumption or the maximum heart rate in well trained cyclists.

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