Discrimination in the work

by Eric
(Kenya)

Original Text: Discrimination in the work


Discrimination in the work place has had a long history ever since the early Industrial Revolution. Through the years trade unions and governments have struggled to ensure that this vice is eradicated. Today, career, education and business opportunities have really opened up for women, and there are successful females in many different sectors, never the less, gender discrimination still persists and more so in the business world. A poll, conducted in April and May by the Pew Research Center (2010) shows that in both developed and developing countries, there is a pronounced gap between beliefs in the equality of the sexes. Equal rights must be established for men and women based on maternity considerations, economic developments including wage equalization, and advancement based on individual potential.
Women have today taken positions that were traditionally held by men in business. This means that maternity policies should be put in place. Many businesses have not handled pregnancy fairly and establishing equal rights means creating fair policies that allow for maternity in a fair manner. According to Greenfield (2009) pregnancy can often be the cause of negative attitudes, and it is important that pregnancy it doesn’t portray that an employee’s priorities are misplaced. It is important to note that this is prevalent in male dominated business or work places. In establishing equal rights in business, physiological differences, particularly maternity, should be considered.
Furthermore, establishing fair and equal treatment for women in business, including bridging the wage gap between men and women, is an important incentive for women to not only join the labor force, but also provides a platform for them to establish stable and long-term careers that help in the growth of economy. A report by Diversity Council in Australia, (2010) indicate that women earn 16 percent lower than men.

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Revised Text: Discrimination in the Workplace

Discrimination in the workplace has had a long history, ever since the early Industrial Revolution. Through the years, trade unions and governments have struggled to ensure that this vice is eradicated. Today, career, education and business opportunities have really opened up for women, and there are successful females in many different sectors. Nevertheless, gender discrimination still persists and more so in the business world.

A poll, conducted in April and May by the Pew Research Center (2010) shows that in both developed and developing countries, there is a pronounced gap between beliefs in the equality of the sexes. Equal rights must be established for men and women based on maternity considerations, economic developments including wage equalization, and advancement based on individual potential.

Women today have entered positions that were traditionally held by men in business. This means that maternity policies should be put in place. Many businesses have not handled pregnancy fairly, and establishing equal rights means creating fair policies that allow for maternity in a fair manner. According to Greenfield (2009), pregnancy can often be the cause of negative attitudes, and it is important that pregnancy itself doesn’t portray an employee’s priorities as being misplaced. It is important to note that this is prevalent in male dominated business and work places. In establishing equal rights in business, physiological differences, particularly maternity, should be considered.

Furthermore, establishing fair and equal treatment for women in business, including bridging the wage gap between men and women, is an important incentive for women to not only join the labor force, but also provides a platform for them to establish stable and long-term careers that help in the growth of the economy. A report by the Diversity Council in Australia, (2010) indicated that women earn 16 percent lower than men.

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