Fresh fruit and vegetable marketing chain

by Yanee
(Bangkok, Thailand)

Original Text: Fresh fruit and vegetable marketing chain


FFV in market is mainly supplied by small farmer scattering nationwide with over 24 million farmers or 37% of Thai population (DOAE, 2009). In some areas, farmers may form a group for bargaining power benefit. After harvesting, farmer can direct sell their FFV at local market as well as supply to farmer group, cooperatives and local collectors. Farmers normally sell and transport directly to rural or local markets and cooperatives by themselves. Farmers usually grade, pack and distribute FFV from farm to cooperatives or farmer groups. While, collector (local and regional collectors) buy FFV from farmers either at the farms or at road side (for fruit in the Eastern region) and transport them to wholesale market at provincial and regional level. There are various collectors and assemblers (mostly private trader) at difference market level (local, regional, national) in Thailand. Farmers, collectors and cooperatives supply also FFV directly to wholesale markets at provincial, regional and central level. Wholesale markets nationwide play their role as distribution center of FFV to other channels e.g. fresh markets and supermarket. Similar in other developing countries, there are several large wholesale markets in Thailand; most of them are privately owned. There are 17 major fresh food and FFV wholesale markets nationwide including 3 major markets in Bangkok and vicinity (namely Talad Thai, Simum Maung and Pak Klong Talad) and 14 markets scattered every regions of Thailand. Within wholesale market, there are networks of small traders including farmers, medium to large traders and wholesalers. Many medium to large traders in the Talad Thai market are also assemblers and suppliers of supermarkets.

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Revised Text:

Fresh fruits and vegetables in the market are mainly supplied by small farmers scattered nationwide. The over 24 million farmers are 37% of the Thai population (DOAE, 2009). In some areas, farmers may form groups for bargaining power. After harvesting, a farmer can directly sell their FFV at local markets as well as supply farmers' groups, cooperatives and local collectors. Farmers normally sell and transport directly to rural or local markets and cooperatives themselves or grade, pack and distribute FFV from farm to cooperatives or farmer groups. Collectors (local and regional) buy FFV from farmers, either at the farms or on the road-side (for fruit in the Eastern region) and transport them to wholesale markets at the provincial and regional levels. There are various collectors and assemblers (mostly private traders) at difference market levels (local, regional, national) in Thailand. Farmers, collectors and cooperatives also supply FFV directly to wholesale markets at the provincial, regional and central levels.

Wholesale markets nationwide play their role as distribution centers of FFV to other channels, e.g. fresh markets and supermarkets. Similar to other developing countries, there are several large wholesale markets in Thailand, most of them privately owned.

There are 17 major fresh food and FFV wholesale markets nationwide, including 3 major markets in Bangkok and vicinity (namely Talad Thai, Simum Maung and Pak Klong Talad), and 14 markets scattered among the regions of Thailand. Within wholesale markets, there are networks of small traders, including farmers, medium to large traders and wholesalers. Many medium to large traders in the Talad Thai market are also assemblers and suppliers of supermarkets.

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