Greek

by Nick
(Michiga)

Original Text: Greek


The Olympic Rings; easily one of the most recognizable symbols of the world, but what does it represent? The Rings symbolize the union of the five continents and there colors represent at least one color on every nations flag. The mission of the Olympics now and back in ancient Greece were very similar, bring people together to celebrate through athletic contest. What is celebrated now in the world, and what was celebrated in ancient Greece, are totally different, but both games brought people together in the same way. The similarities and differences of the Olympics today and that of ancient athletic contest, such as the Olympics of ancient Greece, are abundant. This is due to the fact that they are the same thing, but they are held in different times during earths history, so the people of the games have changed to meet what the people want. Today's Olympic Games are for international prestige and the ancient Greece major games were for honoring the gods that they represented. Some of the differences and similarities of the Olympics of ancient Greece and modern Olympic games is the way they are spectated, the ideas of each Olympic games in ancient Greece and modern time, both male and female athletes of the Olympics, the prizes, and finally the secondary uses for there sports. The Olympics are a prestigious event, and the countries and athletes gain great honor and prestige by wining events; this is what makes the Olympics so interesting.
Many people today watch the Olympic game by either actually going to the nation that is hosting the game or by watching it on T.V. But back in ancient Greece it was a little more difficult for them to travel, and they did not even have to leave there country to go to the games! The difficultly for the ancient Greeks was that they had to make a pilgrimage to Olympia from their city-state that they lived in. In Olympia, where the main games called the Olympic games were held, there was no town to house or feed the people that made the pilgrimage. Instead it was a religious sanctuary were they praised the god of Zeus thru athletic contest, music, and festivals and the only buildings there were for the games and the Temple of Zeus. To the Greeks is was a religious duty to make the voyage to Olympia to spectate the Olympic games and to honor and pray to the gods. If you were fortunate enough to survive the journey, which was usually an average of a couple hundred miles, and make it to the Olympic games or any other games for that matter than you would have to with-stand very heated days and hunt and kill your own food. There was no stadium seating either so they would have to either stand of sit in the grass to see an event. You would also see naked athletes training in gymnasiums or performing their events every day. There is debate about why the men performed nude but the myth goes that it began when a runner lost his loincloth and tripped on it. Everyone took off his loincloth after that (Lovgren 2004)

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Revised Text:

The Olympic Rings is easily one of the most recognizable symbols in the world, but what does it represent? The Rings symbolize the union of the five continents and the colors represent at least one color on every nations flag.

The mission of the Olympics now is very similar to that back in ancient Greece, to bring people together to celebrate through athletic contests. What is celebrated now in the world, and what was celebrated in ancient Greece, are totally different, but both games brought people together in the same way. The similarities and differences of the Olympics today to the ancient athletic contests, such as the Olympics of ancient Greece, are abundant. This is because they are the same thing, but held in different times in history, and the games have changed to meet what the people want.

Today's Olympic Games are for international prestige. The ancient Greek games were for honoring the gods that they represented. Some of the differences and similarities of the ancient Greek and modern Olympics are; the ways they are spectated, the ideas represented, including both male and female athletes, the prizes, and finally the secondary uses for there sports.

The Olympics are a prestigious event, and the countries and athletes gain great honor and prestige by wining events. This is what makes the Olympics so interesting.

Many people today watch the Olympic games by either actually going to the nation that is hosting the game or by watching them on TV, but back in ancient Greece it was a little more difficult for them to travel, and they did not even have to leave their own country to go to the games! The difficultly for the ancient Greeks was that they had to make a pilgrimage to Olympia from their home city-states. In Olympia, where the main Olympic games were held, there was no town to house or feed the people who made the pilgrimage. Instead it was a religious sanctuary where they praised the god Zeus through athletic contests, music, and festivals. The only buildings there were the Temple of Zeus or for the games.

To the Greeks is was a religious duty to make the voyage to Olympia to watch the Olympic games and to honor and pray to the gods. If you were fortunate enough to survive the journey, which was usually a couple hundred miles, and made it to the Olympic games, or any other games for that matter, you would have to with-stand very hot days and hunt and kill your own food. There was no stadium seating either, so they would have to either stand or sit on the grass to see an event.

You would also see naked athletes training in gymnasiums or performing their events every day. There is debate about why the men performed nude, but the myth goes that it began when a runner lost his loincloth and tripped on it. Everyone took off his loincloth after that. (Lovgren 2004)

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