Guaranteed Samsara

Original Text: Guaranteed Samsara


Samsara is a product of Hinduism and is a cycle of birth, life, death, and reincarnation. If Samsara was assured I would want to live my life in accordance with the hinduistic virtues that would enable me to be reincarnated into the best possible person in my next life. If there were no belief in reincarnation or an afterlife determined by behavior during life on earth people may live life recklessly. They may act as though what is done on earth has no ramifications after death; however, most people who want to be good would still be good regardless of Samsara.
Samsara teaches that depending on a persons actions in life he is reincarnated accordingly. In India where Hinduism was created the caste system is fixed. A prince who acted unjustly could be reincarnated as a Vaishya in his next life. Subsequently, a Harijan could be reincarnated into a Shundra if he was good during his previous life. The only way a person can move up in class is to die and be reincarnated. Believing in Samsara would cause a person to be most vigilant about faith. He would want to obey his Dharma, be socially responsible, and be the best at whatever profession he is in. Also, if Samsara was assured, he would want to obtain as much wisdom during life so that he could be closer to moksha in his next reincarnation.
A goal of a Hinduism is moksha, the release of the soul from Samsara. When one attains moksha the cycle of Samsara is broken and a persons Atman, the personal soul, is united with the Brahman, the universal soul. There are four paths to moksha: knowledge, meditation, devotion, and good works. This belief would cause a person to perform all that is necessary to eventually achieve moksha, and forgo all that would retard the quest to find inner peace and become one with the universe.
Hinduism teaches that for a person to move up in his next life he must obtain good karma in his present life. Karma is attained thru selfless acts for others. The guarantee of Samsara would improve personal relationships between individuals because they would want to attain good karma to move up in the caste system during their next life.
The hinduistic belief in Samsara is an important part of the religion because it gives people a reason to be better in their day-to-day life. This desire to be better is made because people have an incentive to be good. Hinduism teaches that if a person obeys the virtues of hinduism he will be rewarded in his next life. I believe that without the belief in any afterlife or reincarnation people who want to be good would still be good regardless; however, the belief in such things helps people be better because who they are in their present life determines who they will become in their next life. By working hard, being kind to other people, being selfless, and being devoted to the hindu religion a person can eventually attain moksha, the wisdom that is so highly regarded in hinduism.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Revised Text:

Samsara is a product of Hinduism and is the cycle of birth, life, death and reincarnation. If Samsara was assured, I would want to live my life in accordance with the Hindu virtues that would enable me to be reincarnated into the best possible person in my next life. If there was no belief in reincarnation or an afterlife determined by behavior during life on earth, people might live life recklessly. They might act as though what were done on earth had no ramifications after death. However, most people who want to be good would still be good regardless of Samsara.

Samsara teaches that, depending on a persons' actions in life, he is reincarnated accordingly. In India, where Hinduism was created, the caste system is fixed. A prince who acted unjustly could be reincarnated as a Vaishya in his next life. Alternatively, a Harijan could be reincarnated into a Shundra if he was good during his previous life. The only way a person can move up in class is to die and be reincarnated.

Believing in Samsara would cause a person to be most vigilant about faith. He would want to obey his Dharma, be socially responsible, and be the best at whatever profession he is in. Also, if Samsara were assured, he would want to obtain as much wisdom during life as he could so that he could be closer to Moksha in his next reincarnation.

One goal of a Hinduism is Moksha, the release of the soul from Samsara. When one attains Moksha the cycle of Samsara is broken and a persons' Atman, the personal soul, is united with the Brahman, the universal soul. There are four paths to Moksha; knowledge, meditation, devotion, and good works. This belief would cause a person to perform all that is necessary to eventually achieve Moksha, and forgo all that would retard the quest to find inner peace and become one with the universe.

Hinduism teaches that, for a person to move up in his next life, he must obtain good Karma in his present life. Karma is attained through selfless acts for others. The guarantee of Samsara would improve personal relationships between individuals because they would want to attain good Karma to move up in the caste system in their next life.

The Hindu belief in Samsara is an important part of the religion because it gives people a reason to be better in their day-to-day lives. This desire to be better is because people have an incentive to be good. Hinduism teaches that, if a person obeys the virtues of hinduism, he will be rewarded in his next life. I believe that, without the belief in any afterlife or reincarnation, people who want to be good would still be good regardless. However, the belief in such things helps people be better because who they are in their present life determines who they will become in their next life.

By working hard, being kind to other people, being selfless, and being devoted to the Hindu religion, a person can eventually attain Moksha, the wisdom that is so highly regarded in Hinduism.

Editor:

1. Please review the text carefully to ensure your intended meaning was not mistakenly changed.

2. Before you leave this page, please take a moment to use the "Click here to post comments." link at the bottom of the page to rate the proofreading and leave a comment if you wish.


Proofreading and editing pages that receive ratings and comments are moved to the top of the list.

Click here to post comments

Return to Free English Proofreading and Editing Archive January - March 2011.