Made Up Myth

by Daniel
(Ohio)

Original Text: Made Up Myth


Once upon a time, there were two gods, Aristotle and Galileo. Aristotle and Galileo were intimate friends that lived on Mount Olympus. Aristotle and Galileo were both gods of astronomy. Everyday they would hang out, look at the sun, and study it together.
One hot, steamy day on Mount Olympus, Aristotle and Galileo were out observing the sun and wanted to change the hot temperatures and the same weather they had everyday. They decided to ask the god of all gods, Zeus, to change the temperature and weather on Mount Olympus. On their way up to Zeus, Aristotle and Galileo played rock-paper-scissors and whoever lost had to talk to Zeus. Sadly, Zeus was sleeping and Aristotle and Galileo’s rock-paper-scissors game had woken Zeus. Zeus was exhausted and a little bad tempered from the war against his father, Cronus, and sent Aristotle and Galileo on opposite sides of Mount Olympus.
From that point on, Aristotle and Galileo lived separate and secluded lives on opposite sides of Mount Olympus. Everyday they both would go out, examine the sun, and recall all the good times they had together. It took Aristotle and Galileo several months to forget about the past and their good times together. One day, on opposite sides of Mount Olympus, Aristotle and Galileo were studying the sun, and they heard a rumor that Zeus that was going to enforce a law that said there was to be only one god for astronomy. A few weeks had passed, but Aristotle and Galileo had heard nothing more about the rumor they heard about the new law Zeus was going to enforce. A few days later, Aristotle and Galileo received a letter from Zeus that said, “There will be a competition on your knowledge of astronomy, and the winner will be the true god of astronomy.”
For the next several weeks, Aristotle and Galileo prepared for the upcoming contest to be the future god of astronomy. They even came up with new ideas about the differences in the solar system and on earth. The competition day was approaching, and both Aristotle and Galileo were both trying to remember everything they could about the solar system and astronomy.
It was the day of the competition; Aristotle and Galileo were both confident that they would be named the new astronomy god. When they arrived at the top of Mount Olympus where the competition was being held, they saw Copernicus, Newton, Kepler, and others all fighting for the title, “God of Astronomy.” The first few rounds of the competition contained fairly easy questions, but the other competitors made mistakes and were eliminated. The competition was going by fast, and before you knew it, Aristotle and Galileo were the only two remaining contestants. Zeus announced, “Since both of you made it to the final round, you can only give one of your beliefs about the solar system. Then I will decide who is to be the true god.” First went Aristotle, and he said, “Heavier objects would fall faster than lighter objects.” Then came Galileo, and he said, “An objects mass has no effect on how fast it falls.” Zeus then decides on both of Aristotle and Galileo’s beliefs, and concludes that Galileo has won. After the competition ends, Zeus grants Galileo's reward, which was the tilting of earth's axis. This allows the earth to change seasons and temperatures throughout the year. Although Galileo won, Aristotle was as happy as Galileo, and for the rest of their life, they continued to examine the sun together as friends.

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Revised Text:

Once upon a time, there were two gods, Aristotle and Galileo. Aristotle and Galileo were intimate friends who lived on Mount Olympus. Aristotle and Galileo were both gods of astronomy. Everyday they would hang out, look at the sun, and study it together.

One hot, steamy day on Mount Olympus, Aristotle and Galileo were out observing the sun and wanted to change the hot temperatures and the same weather they had everyday. They decided to ask the god of all gods, Zeus, to change the temperature and weather on Mount Olympus. On their way up to Zeus, Aristotle and Galileo played rock-paper-scissors, and whoever lost would have to talk to Zeus. Sadly, Zeus was sleeping and Aristotle and Galileo’s rock-paper-scissors game had awakened Zeus. Zeus was exhausted and a little bad tempered from the war against his father, Cronus, and sent Aristotle and Galileo to opposite sides of Mount Olympus.

From that point on, Aristotle and Galileo lived separate and secluded lives on opposite sides of Mount Olympus. Everyday they would both go out, examine the sun, and recall all the good times they had had together. It took Aristotle and Galileo several months to forget about the past and their good times together. One day, on opposite sides of Mount Olympus, Aristotle and Galileo were studying the sun, and they heard a rumor that Zeus that was going to enforce a law that said there was to be only one god for astronomy. A few weeks had passed, but Aristotle and Galileo had heard nothing more about the rumor about the new law Zeus was going to enforce. A few days later, Aristotle and Galileo received a letter from Zeus that said, “There will be a competition on your knowledge of astronomy, and the winner will be the true god of astronomy.”

For the next several weeks, Aristotle and Galileo prepared for the upcoming contest to choose the future god of astronomy. They even came up with new ideas about the differences in the solar system and on earth. The competition day was approaching, and both Aristotle and Galileo were trying to remember everything they could about the solar system and astronomy.

On the day of the competition, Aristotle and Galileo were both confident that they would be named the new astronomy god. When they arrived at the top of Mount Olympus, where the competition was to be held, they saw Copernicus, Newton, Kepler, and others, all fighting for the title, “God of Astronomy.” The first few rounds of the competition contained fairly easy questions, but the other competitors made mistakes and were eliminated. The competition was going by fast, and before you knew it, Aristotle and Galileo were the only two remaining contestants.

Zeus announced, “Since both of you have made it to the final round, you can only give one of your beliefs about the solar system. I will then decide who is to be the true god.” Aristotle went first, and he said, “Heavier objects would fall faster than lighter objects.” Then came Galileo, and he said, “An object's mass has no effect on how fast it falls.” Zeus then considered both Aristotle and Galileo’s beliefs, and concluded that Galileo had won. After the competition ended, Zeus granted Galileo's reward, which was the tilting of the earth's axis. This allowed the earth to change seasons and temperatures throughout the year. Although Galileo won, Aristotle was as happy as Galileo, and for the rest of their lives they continued to examine the sun together as friends.

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Jan 22, 2012
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Comment on your work NEW
by: Atlanta

I think your work is very well, i think you could have added more adventure to the story or perhaps treacherey of some sort however i think you are a very talented person and in future should post more of your stories good luck bye,


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