Multiculturalism

by Lamiaa
(Cairo, Egypt)

Original Text: Multiculturalism


Abu-Jaber emphasizes on the differences between Arabic culture and American culture. One of these differences is the importance of the national and cultural identity for Arabs. Han explains the difference between Mahfouz and Hemingway and why Mahfouz is unique. He tells his students that the uniqueness of Mahfouz comes from both place and identity. He explains that "Hemingway slipped easily between national identities" (110) because he travels all over the world and meets different people, while Mahfouz "has spent almost his entire life in the same streets and neighborhood, writing about Cairo and its people, yet he's considered an international author" (110). Abu-Jaber introduces Mahfouz as an example of Arabic culture because he gives especial attention to the idea of national identity. Mahfouz's work "was shaped by being so Egyptian" (110). Abu-Jaber believes that Mahfouz is the best representative of Arabic literature because, like Han suggests, Mahfouz's works are "very accessible to American readers" (108). Mahfouz is accessible to American readers because "he's been part of creating an exciting new national identity" (108).

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Revised Text:

Abu-Jaber emphasizes the differences between Arabic and American cultures. One of these differences is the importance of the national and cultural identity for Arabs. Han explains the difference between Mahfouz and Hemingway, and why Mahfouz is unique. He tells his students that the uniqueness of Mahfouz comes from both place and identity. He explains that "Hemingway slipped easily between national identities" (110) because he traveled all over the world and met different people, while Mahfouz "has spent almost his entire life in the same streets and neighborhood, writing about Cairo and its people, yet he's considered an international author" (110).

Abu-Jaber introduces Mahfouz as an example of Arabic culture because he gives special attention to the idea of national identity. Mahfouz's work "was shaped by being so Egyptian" (110). Abu-Jaber believes that Mahfouz is the best representative of Arabic literature because, as Han suggests, Mahfouz's works are "very accessible to American readers" (108). Mahfouz is accessible to American readers because "he's been part of creating an exciting new national identity" (108).

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