Piece 7

by Beatrice
(US)

Original Text: Piece 7


Although Askari et al. distinguishes the aim of the regional governments on military expenditure in order to narrow down the wide ranging effects on economic performance and welfare, it seems that the reasons could be analyzed in more details. However, when a government transferring financial capital from civilian sector of its economy towards the military sector thus, reducing the investment potential in the civilian economy and production. Therefore, the ability of government to allocate resources towards the provisioning of civilian public goods such as education and health care are decreased. According to Askari et al., lower investment, increased inflation rate and reducing private civilian sector's investment, higher budget deficit and higher destruction of human life are the further possible negative effects of military expenditure. Not only, militarization affects the citizenry economic but also, the future generation suffer as oil resources have been used to finance military expenditure. Askari et al. discuss the oil revenues have provided a ground for financing the weaponry. Proceeding with the military expenditure for the Persian Gulf countries during 1998-2005, Saudi Arabia constitutes the major part of the Persian Gulf military expenditure, while other Persian Gulf countries that are comparable to one another. Askari et al. reiterate their major argument in this Chapter: the growth rate of military expenditure in the Persian Gulf has economic, historical and political reasons. Militarisation as representing the military sector of security could be explained, for example, by referring to regional securitization processes as suggested within the Copenhagen School theory. Additional depth is added to this analysis when the authors go through the detailed military expenditure in the Persian Gulf in Chapter Three.

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Revised Text:

Although Askari, et al. distinguish the aim of the regional governments on military expenditures in order to narrow down the wide ranging effects on economic performance and welfare, it seems that the reasons could be analyzed in more detail. When a government transfers financial capital from the civilian sector of its economy towards the military sector, it reduces the investment potential in the civilian economy and production. Therefore, the ability of government to allocate resources towards the provisioning of civilian public goods, such as education and health care, is decreased. According to Askari et al., lower investment, an increased inflation rate and reducing the private, civilian sector's investment, higher budget deficits and a higher destruction of human life are the further possible negative effects of military expenditures. Militarization not only affects the citizenry's economics, but also future generations suffer as oil resources have been used to finance military expenditures.

Askari et al. discuss oil revenues having provided for financing of weaponry. Looking at the military expenditure for the Persian Gulf countries during 1998-2005, Saudi Arabia constitutes the major part of the military expenditures, while the other Persian Gulf countries are comparable to one another. Askari et al. reiterate their major argument in this Chapter: the growth rate of military expenditure in the Persian Gulf has economic, historical and political reasons. Militarization, as representing the military sector of security, could be explained, for example, by referring to regional securitization processes as suggested within the Copenhagen School theory. Additional depth is added to this analysis when the authors go through the detailed military expenditures in the Persian Gulf in Chapter Three

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