Reflection #2

by Inma
(Illinois)

Original Text: Reflection #2


Since the School Library Journal publishes a printed version, I decided to check it out, mostly because I prefer to read printed material rather that online. I was able to check out the November 2010 issue from my local library, they receive the subscription but they are not out displayed with the rest of the magazines; I had to ask and I think that is why they gave me an older issue. Overall, I was disappointed with the hard copy, maybe because I had high expectations and thought the experience would be much different. At the end, I felt the online version seemed to have more information and less advertisement. The printed version is organized in two main sections, front section with all the articles, techknowledge, and columns. The second section includes all the reviews (multimedia, book by grade levels, graphic novel, professional readings, title index, etc.) I liked the book review sections, not only because it was grouped by grade levels, which made it easier to look for books my kids would be interested on, but also because it has a Spanish book review section and English translations to Spanish that was very informative. I liked the pictures and the articles in general, but I felt like I was getting enough for the investment.
When I went back online and browsed the sections, I realized that the links to the different blogs and articles gave me so much more within a few clicks than the printed journal could ever do. From all our readings one common theme is the need for school librarians to be on the know, to be ahead of the new technologies, new information literacy skills, new research methods, new curriculum standards, etc. The online version gave me all that and much more! The downside here is that one could get so involved than several hours would go by before you know, and who has that much time, certainly not 21st century librarians.
While browsing away I came across this article “Fully loaded: Outfitting a teacher librarian for the 21st century” by Joyce Valenza, who we have read for this week’s discussion. This article is similar in nature to our reading with a lot of emphasis on the need for future teacher librarian’s to master technology skills. The skills that would ensure we could share information on new mediums, that we can help students create new information, and publish their work in a digital environment. Her list is long from mastering publishing platforms, creating a strong web presence, learning to digitally tell a story, understanding intellectual property in a digital world to social networking. After reading these articles, I keep thinking “how am I going to learn all these things?” the fear on my face must has been noticeable because my husband asked if I was ok. I told him I would be once I embrace the wonders of technology and delve myself into some much needed self training.

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Revised Text:

Since the School Library Journal publishes a printed version, I decided to check it out, mostly because I prefer to read printed material rather that online. I was able to check out the November 2010 issue from my local library. They receive the subscription but it is not displayed out with the rest of the magazines. I had to ask, and I think that is why they gave me an older issue. Overall, I was disappointed with the hard copy, maybe because I had high expectations and thought the experience would be much different. In the end, I felt the online version seemed to have more information and less advertising.

The printed version is organized into two main sections, the front section with all the articles, tech-knowledge, and columns. The second section includes all of the reviews, multimedia, books by grade level, graphic novels, professional readings, title index, etc. I liked the book review sections, not only because it was organized by grade level, which makes it easier to look for books my kids would be interested in, but also because it has a Spanish book review section and English translations of Spanish that are very informative. I liked the pictures and the articles in general, but I felt like I was not getting enough for the investment.

When I went back online and browsed the sections, I realized that the links to the different blogs and articles gave me so much more within a few clicks than the printed journal could ever do. From all our readings, one common theme is the need for school librarians to be "in the know," to be ahead of the; new technologies, new information literacy skills, new research methods, new curriculum standards, etc. The online version gave me all that and much more!

The downside here is that one could get so involved that several hours would go by before you knew it, and who has that much time? Certainly not 21st century librarians.

While browsing away, I came across this article, “Fully loaded: Outfitting a teacher librarian for the 21st century” by Joyce Valenza, who we have read for this week’s discussion. This article is similar in nature to our reading, with a lot of emphasis on the need for future teacher-librarian’s to master technology skills. The skills that would ensure we could share information on new mediums, that we can help students create new information, and publish their work in a digital environment. Her list is long; from mastering publishing platforms, creating a strong web presence, learning to digitally tell a story, understanding intellectual property in a digital world, to social networking.

After reading these articles, I keep thinking “How am I going to learn all these things?” The fear on my face must has been noticeable because my husband asked if I was OK. I told him that I would be, once I embrace the wonders of technology and immerse myself in some much needed self training.

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