Sentimental Education

Original Text: Sentimental Education


My Sentimental Education
There are two types of education we receive in this world: a sentimental education and a didactic education. My sentimental education, in other words, my social education has taught me many skills I believe essential in pursuing a career in a healthcare field. Among these skills are team work, patience, and diligence.
While working at my mother’s clinic, I discovered the importance of team work. The clinic had recently opened and had four employees. My mother and I worked the Saturday morning clinics, accomplishing tasks that usually involved her entire staff. I worked as the receptionist and the nurse, receiving and entering patients’ vital signs. My mother would visit the patients and send me the charges for the visit. At the end of the patient’s visit, I would act as a manager resolving any insurance or billing issues. It is in this altruistic manner that Saturday morning clinics were constructively ensued. Had we not worked together as a team, dividing the tasks equally, we would have lost patients, as well as the reputation of the clinic.
My parents always taught me that success can be achieved through hard and honest work. Through my life experiences, I have come to realize that they were right. One of my fondest memories, in which my diligence and perseverance led to my success, was learning how to play Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. As a child, my parents enjoyed taking me to classical music concerts. It was at one of these concerts I first heard and fell in love with Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. Intrigued by the delicate hand movements of the pianist, I became eager to learn the piano; the opportunity to which I received at the age of 13. The minute, I touched those keys; I worked diligently and made sure never to skip a practice. I was able to complete all the three beginner books that were assigned to me within one year of my lessons. I had learned well enough to start playing the Moonlight Sonata. I can not forget how zealous I was when I sat down to perform this intriguing piece at my recital.
I have learned through various experiences in my life, that with confidence and my skills, I can accomplish my goals. I have also come to realize that these same skills will be the key to my success as a future medical student and future physician.

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Revised Text:

My Sentimental Education

There are two types of education we receive in this world: a sentimental education and a didactic education. My sentimental education, in other words, my social education has taught me many skills I believe essential in pursuing a career in the health-care field. Among these skills are team work, patience, and diligence.

While working at my mother’s clinic, I discovered the importance of team work. The clinic had recently opened and had four employees. My mother and I worked Saturday mornings, accomplishing tasks that usually involved her entire staff. I worked as the receptionist and the nurse, receiving and entering patients’ vital signs. My mother would visit the patients and send me the charges for the visit. At the end of the patient’s visit I would act as the manager, resolving any insurance or billing issues. It is in this altruistic manner that Saturday morning clinics were constructively conducted. Had we not worked together as a team, dividing the tasks equally, we would have lost patients, as well as the reputation of the clinic.

My parents always taught me that success can be achieved through hard and honest work. Through my life experiences, I have come to realize that they were right. One of my fondest memories, in which my diligence and perseverance led to my success, was learning how to play Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. As a child, my parents enjoyed taking me to classical music concerts. It was at one of these concerts I first heard and fell in love with the Moonlight Sonata. Intrigued by the delicate hand movements of the pianist, I became eager to learn the piano; and had the opportunity at the age of 13.

From the minute I touched those keys, I worked diligently and made sure never to skip a practice. I was able to complete all three of the beginner books that were assigned to me in one year of lessons. I had learned well enough to start playing the Moonlight Sonata. I can not forget how zealous I was when I sat down to perform this intriguing piece at my recital.

I have learned through various experiences in my life, that with confidence and my skills, I can accomplish my goals. I have also come to realize that these same skills will be the key to my success as a medical student and as a future physician.

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Oct 13, 2015
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Sentimental Education NEW
by: Micheal Elijah

The Sentimental Education was predestined by all but a few of Flaubert’s generation as sick itself: it was called politically wicked, ethically neglected, can you assist with homework and an artistic breakdown.

Aug 19, 2015
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Sentimental Education NEW
by: Anonymous

Possibility Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham. It's just around a man who is infatuated with a young lady who never truly administers to him. They don't get wind up getting together at last. assignment expert .The two are altogether different, however, that is the first book I could think. (Of Human Bondage is a vastly improved read than Sentimental Education in the event that you anticipate perusing either.)

Jan 26, 2011
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a short comment
by: Liudmila

An interesting article & great proofreading!

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