Partition of India

Original Text: Partition of India


Great Britain ruled British India for over two hundred years. India, the most ethnically diverse country in the world was overwhelmed with rebellions and riots on the streets of the country. During these riots, Great Britain has been growing weaker, in the midst of World War II.
At the end of World War II, Great Britain was very weak and bankrupt from the war. Great Britain could not afford India, and India was in open rebellion. Great Britain promised India freedom by July 1948. While fighting for colonization freedom, Indians were fighting for religious freedom. Muslims, of whom there were 92 million, were fighting for a partition of India, into India and Pakistan. Hindus, of whom there were 255 million, wanted a unified country.
Because there were a majority of Hindus in India, many Muslims were afraid of a unified country. Hindus were also prejudiced to Muslims and had rules similar to the Jim Crow Laws that were in place in the United States in the 1900s. For example, Muslims were not allowed to drink from the same water fountains or use the same bathrooms as Hindus. Many Hindus considered Muslims "untouchable." Muslims feared that if there was a single country, Hindus would have dominance, and segregation would continue.
Most of the religious war fought by Muslims was led by Muhammad Ali Jinnah, who was the Governor-General. Most of the religious war fought by Hindus was led by Jawaharlal Nehru, who later become the first prime minister of independent India. Muhammad Ali Jinnah stressed the need for an un-democratic vote because there was a Hindu majority.

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Revised Text:

Great Britain ruled British India for over two hundred years. India, the most ethnically diverse country in the world, was overwhelmed with rebellions and riots in the streets of the country. During these riots, Great Britain was growing weaker in the midst of World War II.

At the end of World War II, Great Britain was very weak and bankrupt from the war and could not afford India. India was in open rebellion, and Great Britain promised India freedom by July 1948. While fighting for colonial freedom, Indians were also fighting for religious freedom. Muslims, of whom there were 92 million, were fighting for a partition of India, separating India and Pakistan. Hindus, of whom there were 255 million, wanted a unified country.

Because there were a majority of Hindus in India, many Muslims were afraid of a unified country. Hindus were also prejudiced against Muslims and had rules similar to the Jim Crow Laws that were in place in the United States in the 1900s. For example, Muslims were not allowed to drink from the same water fountains, or use the same bathrooms as Hindus. Many Hindus considered Muslims "untouchable." Muslims feared that if there was a single country, Hindus would have dominance, and segregation would continue.

Most of the religious war fought by Muslims was led by Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the Governor-General. Most of the religious war fought by Hindus was led by Jawaharlal Nehru, who later become the first prime minister of independent India. Muhammad Ali Jinnah stressed the need for an un-democratic vote because there was a Hindu majority.

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